New York Times burried Obama ACORN major donor story before the election

‘New York Times’ Spiked Obama Donor Story

The New York Times building is shown in New York on June 2008. The Times pulled a story about Barack Obama’s campaign ties to ACORN. (Frank Franklin II/Associated Press)

Congressional Testimony: ‘Game-Changer’ Article Would Have Connected Campaign With ACORN

Constitutional crisis.
This story was published in the Philadelphia Bulletin. Did you see this in your local favorite newspaper?
By Michael P. Tremoglie, The Bulletin
Monday, March 30, 2009

 

A lawyer involved with legal action against Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) told a House Judiciary subcommittee on March 19 The New York Times had killed a story in October that would have shown a close link between ACORN, Project Vote and the Obama campaign because it would have been a “a game changer.” 

Heather Heidelbaugh, who represented the Pennsylvania Republican State Committee in the lawsuit against the group, recounted for the ommittee what she had been told by a former ACORN worker who had worked in the group’s Washington, D.C. office. The former worker, Anita Moncrief, told Ms. Heidelbaugh last October, during the state committee’s litigation against ACORN, she had been a “confidential informant for several months to The New York Times reporter, Stephanie Strom.”

Ms. Moncrief had been providing Ms. Strom with information about ACORN’s election activities. Ms. Strom had written several stories based on information Ms. Moncrief had given her.

During her testimony, Ms. Heidelbaugh said Ms. Moncrief had told her The New York Times articles stopped when she revealed that the Obama presidential campaign had sent its maxed-out donor list to ACORN’s Washington, D.C. office.

Ms. Moncrief told Ms. Heidelbaugh the campaign had asked her and her boss to “reach out to the maxed-out donors and solicit donations from them for Get Out the Vote efforts to be run by ACORN.”

Ms. Heidelbaugh then told the congressional panel:

“Upon learning this information and receiving the list of donors from the Obama campaign, Ms. Strom reported to Ms. Moncrief that her editors at The New York Times wanted her to kill the story because, and I quote, “it was a game changer.”’

Ms. Moncrief made her first overture to Ms. Heidelbaugh after The New York Times allegedly spiked the story — on Oct. 21, 2008. Last fall, she testified under oath about what she had learned about ACORN from her years in its Washington, D.C. office. Although she was present at the congressional hearing, she did not testify.

U.S. Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wisc., the ranking Republican on the committee, said the interactions between the Obama campaign and ACORN, as described by Ms. Moncrief, and attested to before the committee by Ms. Heidelbaugh, could possibly violate federal election law, and “ACORN has a pattern of getting in trouble for violating federal election laws.”  

He also voiced criticism of The New York Times.

“If true, The New York Times is showing once again that it is a not an impartial observer of the political scene,” he said. “If they want to be a mouthpiece for the Democratic Party, they should put Barack Obama approves of this in their newspaper.”

Academicians and journalism experts expressed similar criticism of the Times.

When newspapers start reporting the news, and both sides to an issue, letting us make up my own mind, rather than having it influenced by the unionist/socialist agenda, we will start reading again…until then, God save the Internet.

Newspaper editors purged MBAs from management years ago

Newspapers have not been blessed with the best and the brightest managers. Why? The executive editors sabotage real management and have purged MBAs from their ranks. Kill off the competition.

This is from the WSJ Deal Journal column, a Q&A with Mr. Knee, a highly respected  investment consultant

DJ: What would be your advice to newspaper owners?
Knee: You have seen people outsource everything from printing to editorial and indeed, any kind of journalism where your scale in the local community does not provide you with an advantage should be gotten elsewhere. If you find out how many people the large papers sent to the national conventions, you would wonder whether that’s economically justified. You have to focus on your competitive advantage, which is local. When the smoke clears, the local newspaper, which may not be the sexiest part of the newspaper industry but is overwhelmingly the largest and most profitable part of the industry, will be a smaller and more-focused enterprise whose activities will be directed to those areas where their local presence gives them competitive advantage and they will continue to generate as a result better profits than the supersexy businesses in the media industry asking for government or nonprofit help like movies and music.

The newspaper industry has not been blessed with the best managers, and generations of monopoly profits do dull the senses. On the journalism side, I think many managers would rather have avoided a fight with journalists than actually force them to think harder about what their readers want, rather than what they want their readers to want. In the economic environment we’re in, newspapers can’t afford to do every six-part investigative series they could have done before.

Meanwhile, the rank and file newspaper reporters who were busy covering their beats, don’t make much compared to the executive editors. 

Moma don’t let you’re kids grow up to be newspaper reporters. Have them study business, engineering, law or sales, even bar tending would earn them a better living. The executive editors who scratched their way to the top make big bucks for a while, until the host dies from bad management anyway. 

Ever wonder what kind of money the nation’s top newspapers pay their best journalsits? The top rung of the latter is set by the Newspaper Guild. Once you’ve lasted five or six years after about four years at a small daily and tuition of at least $20,000 a year at a respected J-school, this is it.

New York Times pays the most, $1,675.28 a week after two years. But that’s where it stays fixed until the next Guild negotiations. Of course, New York City has the highest cost of living expenses in the U.S.

Reuters pays $1,587.93 a week after six years.

The San Francisco Chronicle pays $1202.24 a week for six years of journalist experience. I know that is top for the Guild scale, but many of the hard workers, who put in more than 38 hours a week get additional pay above scale.

Consumer Reports takes the No. 1 position with $1,80410 a week scale after four years of experience. The union-biased “non-profit” magazine pays more that the New York Times or San Francisco Chronicle for their pro-union advertorial reports on products.

Can new online newspapers chage for its content? Jeff Jarvis of the LA Times says “No!” And he explains himself very well:


How’s that for a direct answer? Every rule has its exceptions — this one only a few: The Wall Street Journal (paid by expense accounts), Consumer Reports (which serves reviews, not news), iTunes (we may play a unique performance over and over, but I don’t read even my articles more than once) and porn (which is suffering the same problem newspapers are thanks to free competition from, uh, amateurs). But the rule of the new, post-scarcity economy is clear: Charging for news online is dangerous folly. Why? Let me count the reasons if not the dollars:

Once news is known, that knowledge is a commodity and it doesn’t matter who first reported it. There’s no fencing off information, especially today, when the conversation that spreads it moves at the speed of links.

There will be no limit to competitors. Readers, like water, will follow the path of least inconvenience. It’s impossible to compete against free. Have papers learned nothing from Craigslist?

In the old-content economy, one could make much money selling many copies of a product. In today’s link economy online, we need only one copy, and it is the links to it that give it value. So rather than complaining that Google should pay them for aggregating their headlines, news organizations should be grateful that Google does not charge for the links it gives and the readers it sends. Indeed, we should be spending our effort figuring out how to get more links to original reporting to support it.

Putting your content behind a wall cuts it off from the conversation and robs it of influence. Just ask New York Times columnists how much they disliked the pay wall the paper finally demolished.

Not all newspapers are going bankrupt. Many, in small monopoly markets are among the most profitable businesses in America with profit margins much higher than oil companies, Apple, EBay, Cisco, Sprint, AT&T, Google or Microsoft.  Gannett has the lion’s share of these markets. And also the highest ratio of MBAs in the media business. 

Sleepless in Seattle — The Post-Intelligencer shuts down — lives online

Last week: The Seattle Post-Intelligencer has told employees they “might” lose their jobs as soon as next week after a deadline for Hearst Corp to sell the newspaper passed last Monday. 

The news is out, the  146-year-old Seattle Post-Intelligencer prints its last edition tomorrow.

The P-I will continue to “live” on the Internet with a much smaller staff.

I like it. It’s a mix of current and archival. Mikey likes it!

http://www.seattlepi.com 

Owner, the Hearst Corp. reports it has failed to find a buyer for the newspaper, which it put up for sale in January after nine years of financial losses. There are no more suckers left with enough trust fund money to waste.

The end of the print edition leaves The Seattle Times as the only major daily newspaper in the city. 

The TV stations will be there tonight and tomorrow capturing the historic day.

Seattle has been counting TV, and now the internet as their favorite news sources. Do you think people will wait for the Seattle Times to find out?

 

 

Last week:

Read between the lines: Boxes for removing personal items and shredding bins are scheduled to be delivered to the PI floors this week.

Clues suggest Hearst plans to close the P-I shortly

Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports on its own demise
Just after Hearst spokesman Paul Luthringer claimed that “we are still evaluating our options,” Post-Intelligencer staffers learned that boxes and bins are scheduled to be delivered to the newsroom later this week — some for materials to be taken home, others for notes that require shredding. “It would be nice to have some clarity,” says business reporter Joseph Tartakoff. “It’s really hard to plan your work when you’re not sure if you’ll be around the next day.”

The New York Times sold off the majority of its new sky scraper in New York and has a long-term rent agreement. The company no longer owns the roof over its head.

Next, McClatchy announced massive layoffs, and Hearst’s Seattle PI is about to turn into a shadow, online only edition. Meanwhile, back at Hearst’s figurative flagship, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Media Guild has accepted big cuts just to keep most jobs. The Denver Rocky Mountain News shut down a week or so ago. 

McClatchy Co. is shearing another 1,600 jobs in a cost-cutting spree that has clipped nearly one-third of the newspaper publisher’s work force in less than a year.

The latest reduction in payroll announced Monday follows through on the Sacramento-based company’s previously disclosed plans to lower its expenses by as much as $110 million over the next year as its revenue evaporates amid a devastating recession.

The layoffs will start before April. No fooling.

 Several of McClatchy’s 30 daily newspapers, including The Sacramento Bee and The Kansas City Star, already have decided how many workers will be shown the door. Close to 2,000. 

 

Pew Research report
Just 43 percent  of Americans say that losing their local newspaper would hurt civic life in their community “a lot,” according to a Pew Research poll. And even fewer, only 33 percent say they will miss their local newspaper if it folds.

Back to the West Coast

Negotiators for the Guild and the San Francisco Chronicle reached a tentative agreement Monday night changes to the collective bargaining agreement in line with cost cuts planned by Hearst. 

The agreement will require approval by Chronicle Unit Guild members. (They will approve or lose their jobs wholesale). 

A ratification meeting will be scheduled as early as Thursday of this week. Time and place will be announced on Tuesday as soon as a large enough facility can be secured.

In view of the latest terms agreed today, the Guild Negotiating Committee recommends membership approval.

The terms reached late Monday include expanded management ability to lay off employees without regard to seniority. All employees who are discharged in a layoff or who accept voluntary buyouts are guaranteed two weeks’ pay per year of service up to a maximum of one year, plus company-paid health care for the severance term, even in the event of a shutdown – which today’s agreement is designed to avoid.

Guild membership will remain a condition of continued employment for all employees. However, new hires in certain advertising sales positions will be given the option of membership, even though they will retain Guild protection under the contract.

On-callers will be limited to no more than 10 percent in any classification or department.

Pension changes are not part of this agreement, but are being discussed by pension authorities and must be implemented under terms of the Pension Protection Act, due to the recent declines in investment markets. Because those changes may affect the decisions of many members concerning buyouts, we are attempting to reach some key understandings now as to the nature of the changes and when they will take effect.

A lunch-hour meeting on Wednesday March 11, with our pension plan’s lawyer will be held at the Guild Office, 433 Natoma, Third Floor Conference Room.

A bulletin summarizing all the proposed contract changes will be issued Tuesday. A set of the complete proposed amendments will be available on the Guild’s Web site (mediaworkers.org) as soon as possible.

Management is seeking to change the union contract as part of an attempt to cut costs and keep the paper operating under the ownership of the Hearst Corp.

The company said Feb. 24 it would sell or close the paper unless the Guild agreed to changes in the labor agreement in effect through June 2010.

The leaders in the former cash cow industry thought they could just transform to their pages of expensive advertising to Web pages. Sorry. The Web is very competitive and readers will not put up with page after page of ads to follow the news. 

McClatchy is down for the count. The stock is hovering below $1 and will soon be kicked out of the New York Stock Exchange. 

The The Sun of Myrtle Beach and the  Macon Telegraph — McClatchy papers, announced last week that they were outsourcing printing, they joined what one experts are calling the last stage of the dying industry.

Chuck Moozakis, editor-in-chief of Newspapers & Technology, found in a December survey piece that the flight from printing includes mid-sized papers like the two last week, small papers, but also very big ones like the San Francisco Chronicle. Dow Jones has already closed plants in Denver and Chicago and could shutter 10 of the 17 around the country that have printed The Wall Street Journal.

 
“There is a lot of iron sitting out there now,” Moozkis reported.  
“What’s more sobering is the amount of press capacity now available within operations with relatively new presses” like Detroit and Denver. Losing the Rocky Mountain News press run — when it closes (not if) — won’t help, and some of the same impact will come as the two Detroit papers have reduced distribution of a smaller print product most weekdays.
 
 The carbon footprint of newspapers is enormous. At least the unemployed “progressives” can be happy that they are no longer contributing to the worst global warming industry on the planet. 

McClatchy about to be kicked off the New York Stock Exchange as stock falls below $1 dollar.

The elegant McClatchy stock certificates for Class A stock are worth more than the stock itself. *

 

This report is directly from a McClatchy press release. The McClatchy Company today (Feb. 5) reported a net loss from continuing operations in the fourth quarter of 2008 of $20.4 million, or 25 cents per share.

McClatchy also announced that it was notified by the New York Stock Exchange  that it is not in compliance with the NYSE’s continued listing standards. The NYSE’s notice dated February 4, 2009 indicated that on February 2, 2009, the company’s average share price over the previous 30 trading days was $0.98, which is below the NYSE’s quantitative listing standards.

The NYSE listed companies must maintain an average closing price of any listed security above $1 per share for any consecutive thirty trading-day period. McClatchy plans to notify the NYSE of its intent to cure this deficiency and has six months from the date of the NYSE notice to cure the non-compliance. The company’s Class A common stock will continue to be listed on the NYSE during this interim period, subject to compliance with other NYSE listing requirements and the NYSE’s right to reevaluate continued listing standards. In reality, the stock is now considered a “penny stock” and things had better shape up in the next six months. 

There was no report on what McClatchy was doing about its carbon footprint and efforts to slow climate change. 

Revenues in the fourth quarter of 2008 were $470.9 million, down 17.9% from revenues from continuing operations of $573.4 million in the fourth quarter of 2007. Advertising revenues were $388.3 million, down 20.7% from 2007, and circulation revenues were $67.0 million, up 1.4%. Online advertising revenues grew 10.3% in the fourth quarter of 2008 and were 10.9% of total advertising revenues compared to 7.8% of total advertising revenues in the fourth quarter of 2007.

Using cash from operations and proceeds from asset sales, the company repaid $30 million of debt in the quarter and $433 million for all of 2008. Debt at the end of the fiscal year was $2.038 billion, down from $2.471 billion at the end of 2007.

Restructuring plan to calm banks and other investors

McClatchy noted in a press release that the duration and depth of the economic recession have taken a severe toll on its advertising revenues. Given the unprecedented deterioration in revenues and with no visibility of an improving economy, the company is continuing to reduce expenses. McClatchy announced that it is developing a plan to reduce costs by an additional $100 million to $110 million, or approximately seven percent of 2008 cash expenses, over the next 12 months beginning later in the first quarter of 2009.

Details of the plan have not yet been finalized. In addition, the company will freeze its pension plans and temporarily suspend the company match to its 401(k) plans, effective March 31, 2009. The company will extend a salary freeze for senior executives in 2009 that was implemented in 2007. The company previously announced that it had implemented a company-wide salary freeze from September 2008 through September 2009. Gary Pruitt, McClatchy’s chairman and chief executive officer, also has declined any bonus for 2008 and 2009. In addition, other senior executives will not receive bonuses for 2008.

 

The loss from continuing operations for the entire year of 2007 was $2.73 billion, or $33.26 per share, including the effect of the non-cash impairment charges taken in 2007. Adjusted earnings from continuing operations(1) were $110.9 million, or $1.35 per share, in fiscal 2007 after considering the non-cash impairment charges and adjustments for certain discrete tax items. The company’s total net loss, including the results of discontinued operations, was $2.74 billion, or $33.37 per share.

 

Management’s Comments

Commenting on McClatchy’s results, Pruitt said, “2008 was a difficult and disappointing year. We faced troubled economic times and structural changes in our business.

 

“But the economy remains mired in recession and our industry is still in a period of transition. The advertising environment continues to be weak and we expect print advertising revenues to continue to be down. While we do not have final advertising revenue results for January, we know that the month was slower than the fourth quarter. We don’t have any better sense than other market observers as to how long the current recession will last and we do not yet have visibility of revenue trends.

“We must respond with both continued rigor in driving our revenue results as well as permanently reducing our cost structure. At McClatchy we are quickly becoming a hybrid print and online news and information company.

“Evidence of our cost reduction efforts can be found in our results. Excluding severance and other benefit charges related to our previously announced restructuring plans, cash expenses were down 14.4% in the fourth quarter and were down 11.5% in all of 2008.

“This necessary transition to a more efficient company is especially painful in a horrible economy and we have had to make some very difficult decisions to keep the company safe,” Pruitt said. “Even so, we are determined to treat our employees well and secure their retirement as best we can. So while we have announced that we are freezing our pension plans and will temporarily suspend 401(k) matching contributions as of March 31, we will continue to offer competitive benefits for our employees. We expect to offer a new 401(k) plan later this year that will include both a matching contribution (once reinstated), plus a supplemental contribution that is tied to cash flow performance. I recognize the sacrifices our employees are making to help us get though this difficult time and I appreciate their loyalty to McClatchy. I am confident that the McClatchy team is up to this challenge and we will see brighter days when the economy finally turns.”

Pat Talamantes, McClatchy’s chief financial officer, said, “Our new cost initiatives, combined with our 2008 efforts, are designed to save approximately $300 million annually before severance costs. Approximately $60 million of savings has been realized in 2008, and $44.7 million of severance costs associated with these programs has been expensed in 2008 and largely paid.”

“Despite the downturn in advertising revenues, we still continue to generate significant cash and are using it to repay debt,” Talamantes said. “Our debt at year end is $2.038 billion, down $433 million from the end of 2007. Based on our trailing 12 months of cash flow, our leverage ratio is currently 5.1 times cash flow and our interest coverage ratio is 2.8 times cash flow as defined by our bank agreement — well within the allowable covenant thresholds. We have $159 million in availability under our bank credit lines, and have no significant debt maturities until June 2011. We believe that we can work through this difficult environment, and we expect to make further progress in paying down debt in 2009.”

Other Matters

McClatchy also announced that it was notified by the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) that it is not in compliance with the NYSE’s continued listing standards. The NYSE’s notice dated February 4, 2009 indicated that on February 2, 2009, the company’s average share price over the previous 30 trading days was $0.98, which is below the NYSE’s quantitative listing standards. Such standards require NYSE listed companies to maintain an average closing price of any listed security above $1.00 per share for any consecutive thirty trading-day period. McClatchy plans to notify the NYSE of its intent to cure this deficiency and has six months from the date of the NYSE notice to cure the non-compliance. The company’s Class A common stock will continue to be listed on the NYSE during this interim period, subject to compliance with other NYSE listing requirements and the NYSE’s right to reevaluate continued listing standards.

Consistent with the growing industry practice, McClatchy will discontinue issuing monthly revenue and statistical reports after this release. McClatchy is among the last newspaper companies to report advertising results monthly, and without comparable industry information, management does not believe monthly revenues are as useful to investors. The company will continue to provide revenue trends and other statistical information on a quarterly basis with its earnings releases.

*Class B stock is the stock held by the family, so that has voting rights and much more value when the assets are finally sold. It’s the same model used by the New York Times.

Will terrorists strike again? Why is the U.S. pouring 20,000 troops into cities? There must be some ‘chatter’

UPDATE:

The Washington Post reports that the Pentagon has issued the marching orders to mobilize 20,000 millitary troops to secure unspecified cities within the U.S.

Homeland Securtiy issued warnings of a terror attack on New York City’s mass transit system from Nov. 28 through the holidays (Thanksgiving, Christmas and Hanukkah) the mainstream media doesn’t even have the intellectual honesty to report which holidays. Commuters and vacationing shoppers are supposed to be uneasy and many may even put off their trips to buy gifts. This, as we watch to bloodbath from Nov. 26-28, in Mumbi, India where the death toll has reached 200 from a group of 10 terrorists.

Who did it? We know the terrorists hate Jews. That narrows it down. 

What do the learders of Iran, Palistine and Syria have to say about the bombings? 

A Brooklyn rabbi and his wife were found among the dead in a series of terrorist attacks in India that have claimed more than 150 lives. In response to the attacks, the NYPD beefed up patrols around large hotels and Jewish centers, including the Lubavitcher headquarters, said NYPD spokesman Paul Browne.

The department already was on alert because of a warning earlier this week of a possible al-Qaida plot to strike the city’s rail systems over the holidays.

“The threat is serious, the threat is significant, and it is plausible,” said Congressman Peter King, R-Long Island, a member of the House Homeland Security Committee.

Rabbi Gavriel Noach Holtzberg and his wife, Rivka, who ran the Chabad-Lubavitch local headquarters in Mumbai were killed during a hostage standoff at the center, said Rabbi Zalman Shmotkin, a spokesman for the movement. 

On Wednesday, federal authorities warned New York police of an unsubstantiated (but reliable) report that al-Qaida operatives discussed an attack on New York’s subway system or rail lines like Amtrak and the Long Island Rail Road.

A spokesman for Mayor Michael Bloomberg said he had no plans to comment. (Keep shopping sheelple). 

NYPD spokesman Paul Browne said additional resources were being deployed in the mass transit system in an “abundance of caution,” a common response when police receive new information about a threat.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which runs the city’s 468 stations and 6,480 subway cars, released a statement saying there was “no reason to be alarmed.”

The terrorists have been weakend from eight years of George W. Bush as Commander and Chief. 

We can be thankful for that time.

Obama — what do you know about ACORN and the garden to nowhere?

Inside the Chicago Democrat machine

Updated: 10/11/08

By Mick Gregory

Watch John McCain roll up his sleeves and bring up ACORN, the Citi Bank intimidation lawsuit, the Annenberg $100 million to nowhere and Tony Rezco.

Jailed political fundraiser Antoin “Tony” Rezko, the Chicago real estate developer who helped launch Barack Obama on his political career, is whispering secrets to federal prosecutors about corruption in Illinois and the political fallout could be explosive.

Democratic Gov. Rod Blagojevich, whose administration faces multiple federal investigations over how it handed out jobs and money with advice from Rezko, is considered the most vulnerable but second is non other than Barack Obama.

Rezko also was very friendly with Obama – offering him a job when he finished law school, funding his earliest political campaigns and purchasing a lot next to his house.

Rezko showed Obama around to the king makers and linked him up with Bill Ayers. The rest as they say is history.

Here is another story that  appears to be felony fraud, but you didn’t read it in the New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle or Washington Post. The tabloid Chicago Sun-Times reported a $100,000 state grant for a botanic garden in Englewood that then-state Sen. Barack Obama awarded in 2001 to a group headed by a onetime campaign volunteer is now under investigation by the Illinois attorney general amid new questions, prompted by Chicago Sun-Times reports, about whether the money might have been misspent.

The garden was never built. And now state records obtained by the Sun-Times show $65,000 of the grant money went to the wife of Kenny B. Smith, the Obama 2000 congressional campaign volunteer who heads the Chicago Better Housing Association, which was in charge of the project for the blighted South Side neighborhood.

Smith wrote another $20,000 in grant-related checks to K.D. Contractors, a construction company that his wife, Karen D. Smith, created five months after work on the garden was supposed to have begun, records show. K.D. is no longer in business.

Attorney General Lisa Madigan — a Democrat who is supporting Obama’spresidential bid — is investigating “whether this charitable organization properly used its charitable assets, including the state funds it received,” Cara Smith, Madigan’s deputy chief of staff, said Wednesday.

In addition to the 2001 grant that Obama directed to the housing association as a “member initiative,” the not-for-profit group got a separate $20,000 state grant in 2006.

Madigan’s office has notified Obama’s presidential campaign of the probe, which was launched this week. But Obama’sactions in awarding the money are not a focus of the investigation, Smith said.

Questions about the grant, though, come as spending on local pet projects has become an issue in Obama’s campaign against John McCain.

Obama andKenny Smith announced the “Englewood Botanic Garden Project” at a January 2000 news conference at Englewood High School. Obama was in the midst of a failed bid to oust South Side Democratic Rep. Bobby Rush for a seat in Congress. The garden — planned near and under L tracks between 59th Place and 62nd Place — fell outside of Obama’s Illinois Senate district but within the congressional district’s borders.

Obama vowed to “work tirelessly” to raise $1.1 million to help Smith’s organization turn the City of Chicago-owned lot into an oasis of trees and paths. But Obama lost the congressional race, no more money was raised, and today the garden site is a mess of weeds, chunks of concrete and garbage. The only noticeable improvement is a gazebo. The only tree was sawed down and removed.

The “garden to nowhere” ended up in the pockets of Obama’s campaign staff and maybe Obama himself.

In a previous interview, Smith said the state grant money was legitimately spent, mostly on underground site preparation. Underground? You mean out of sight.

But no one ever took out construction permits required for such work, city records show. And a contractor who Smith said did most of the work told a reporter all he did was cut down trees and grade the site with a Bobcat.

Citing the garden’s failure to take root, NeighborSpace — an umbrella group for dozens of community gardens citywide — moved Sept. 9 to return the site to the city. Its action followed a July 11 Sun-Times report on the grant.

Obama spokesman Michael Ortiz said Wednesday the senator’s staff in Washington will monitor the Madigan probe and an additional review under way by Gov. Blagojevich’s administration to make sure “the taxpayer funds allocated for the construction of the garden are recuperated from CBHA if the agencies determine that the funds were not properly spent.” Obama’s goal is to ensure the site “be used in a way that benefits the community and that any taxpayer dollars allocated are spent wisely,” Ortiz said.

The relationship between Smith and Obama dates to at least 1997, when Obama wrote a letter that Smith used to help the housing association win city funding for an affordable-housing development near the garden site. Plans called for more than 50 homes; a dozen ultimately were built.

Smith also has donated $550 to Obama campaign funds.

The Sun-Times learned about Karen Smith’s involvement in the project through an Aug. 12 Freedom of Information Act response from a lawyer for Blagojevich¹s Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity. The department, according to the lawyer, had ³discovered² 52 pages of ³additional documents² omitted from an initial response in May to a Sun-Times¹ Freedom of Information Act request about the grant.

Neither Smith nor his wife has been accused of any wrongdoing. Smith and his lawyer did not return repeated calls seeking comment.

In an interview in July, Smith said he was never able to raise the money needed for the garden. But the state grant awarded by Obamawas spent properly, he said, on the undergroundwork, withmost of the work done by a contractor whose name Smith got wrong.

The Sun-Times tracked down the contractor, Rodolfo Marin, in Austin, Texas, where he now lives.

“What I was hired for was: Clean up the area and cut the trees — that’s all,” Marin said. He said he rented a Bobcat — a sort of small bulldozer — for the project. “If he spent about $3,000 with me, that was too much.”

Visit this link for more details: http://newsbusters.org/blogs/tom-blumer/2008/09/07/barack-obamas-1-1-million-botanical-garden-er-100-000-gazebo

McCain showed true leadership by stopping his campaign and asking Obama, the Jr. Senator from Chicago Illinois, to help organize a financial bailout loan. What did he get for it? He was insulted by the Democrat leadership.

So why did the Democrats earmark millions to ACORN?

This is what Lindsey Graham said on the Greta Van Susteren show: “And this deal that’s on the table now is not a very good deal. Twenty percent of the money that should go to retire debt that will be created to solve this problem winds up in a housing organization called ACORN that is an absolute ill-run enterprise, and I can’t believe we would take money away from debt retirement to put it in a housing program that doesn’t work.”

Note: ACORN is a front group for Democrat/Socialists convicted of massive voter fraud. Google it yourself.

Ike — the cleanup. FEMA is a perfect example of U.S. Congressional oversight — FEMA semi-trucks filled with ice sit for days in staging area

The largest hurricane to hit Texas in recorded history exposes heroes and losers. Free enterprise, private sector businesses are the heroes. No. 1 – HEB supermarkets were open within 24 hours of the storm throughout Houston with truckloads of ice, food and water.

Walmart and Sam’s Club gets the No. 2 award for full service within 48 hours.

FEMA is a disgrace and should be shut down. There are hundreds of generator trucks parked at Sam Houston Race Track with no apparent system to distribute them. A new report by “Pat and Ed” on 700 AM radio has the FEMA ice trucks sitting idle at the Reliant Stadium stageing center for nearly a  week, then sent to an air base in Sagine, Texas to melt out of sight at an air force base.

This is an example of the waste of the Congressionally managed FEMA project.

Joke of the day: Callers were giving advice on gas station openings, supermarkets with ice and FEMA POD locations.

A joker called in to report that FEMA was handing out $500 checks for those who arrived at the George R. Brown convention center at 5:00 a.m. Hundreds showed up to find it was a hoax. (This ain’t New Orleans).

Instead of free money, some aggressive “victims” were arrested for disorderly conduct and out during the dawn to dusk curfew.

Josh Howard, Mavericks NBA player and Obama supporter doesn’t celebrate July Fourth

In a video posted on YouTube, Josh Howard is shown at Allen Iverson’s charity flag football game in July. When the national anthem is being sung, various participants are shown mugging for the camera. When the camera gets to Howard, he says: ” ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’ is going on. I don’t celebrate this [expletive (shit?)]. I’m black.”

Why doesn't Obama put his hand on his heart for the National Anthem? Is is a Black Power statement?

Why?

Continue reading

Chinese upset with Greorge W. Bush’s speech at Olympics about freedom

What kind of reception will Bush get? Perhaps a steaming platter of dog or perhaps a horse penis, both delicacies in China.

In a speech highlighting America’s historic freedoms and challenges ahead  in Asia, President Bush had boldly pushed China to enact a free press, free assembly,  freedom of religion  and labor rights in China, and spoke out sharply against its imprisonment of its citizens, human rights advocates and religious leaders. He said he wasn’t trying to antagonize China, but called such reform the only path the U.S. rival can take to reach its full potential.

This  sets the stage for an interesting reception when he attends the opening ceremonies Friday evening and meets with Hu on Sunday after attending church.

No other U.S. president has been so blunt with the Chinese  in modern history.

What kind of reception will Bush get? Perhaps a steaming platter of dog or perhaps a horse penis and testicles,  delicacies in China.

The Rev. Jeremiah Wright Is Preaching to the Democrat Choir. What He Says Sounds A Lot Like MoveOn.Org

The Democrat front runner, Barack Obama will clear things up this morning by distancing himself from his Trinity Church Minister, Rev. Wright. But why? Isn’t that the same hate speech that has been feeding the Democrat Party for the past 40 years?

This is the core of the Democrat Party.
Only the liberal elite, white leaders are to be the top of the ticket. Obama went beyond his station in life. He was to be Hillary’s “running mate.” Get to the back of the Clinton bus, Obama.
Rev Jerimiah Wright

“That anger” of black men like Wright, Obama said, “may not get expressed in public, in front of white co-workers or white friends. But it does find voice in the barbershop or around the kitchen table. … to condemn it without understanding its roots, only serves to widen the chasm of misunderstanding that exists between the races.”

Post this sign in public places!

The Star Tribune bankrupt

By Mick Gregory

We are observing the death throws of a star on its way to becoming a white dwarf. Gasses spewing, used matter is shredded and  thrown out. The size of the once bright, powerful force rapidly shrinks as it collapses on itself. These are the telltale signs of a dying star.

The Star Tribune, once among the Midwest’s largest newspapers, was purchased by the Sacramento-based McClatchy media company in 1998. The “executive editors”  paid $1.2 billion for it from a family who wanted out of the business.

In less than 10 years, the rapid growth of Google, Drudgereport, Craigslist, E-Bay, FaceBook and WordPress lured away much of the newspaper audience and built new readers/users that were not newspaper-friendly. So the advertising found new rising stars.

Last year, Avista, a New York-based private equity group, purchased the dying Star Tribune for less than half of what McClatchy paid only eight years earlier.

Since Avista’s purchase, the star has been shedding  reporters, editors, photographers, advertising sales staff and designers through two rounds of buyouts and the elimination of open positions. That was just a show for creditors.

Now, in January of 2008, the Star-Tribune filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. 

The Star Tribune’s long-term business slump has continued, with revenue declining by about 25 percent, from $400 million in 2000 to $300 million last year, according to a Star Tribune story in July. While major expenses such as newsprint and transportation  increased.  Even those adult newspaper carriers throwning papers out of the window of their pickups, need to be paid.

Several weeks ago, Avista announced that it was writing down the value of its $100 million equity investment in the Star Tribune to $25 million. That’s $75 million wiped out in one year. The Star shed more than $1.15 billion in value over nine years. The new owners are getting pennies on the dollar trying to restructure their debt.

The only candidates for buying into debt-ridden newspapers now are hedge funds, especially those that make a specialty of distressed debt investments, according to several industry observers. It’s called a loan-to-own strategy, they calculate that the owners like Avista will default on their new loans and the fund becomes the new owner for pennies on the dollar. What’s left may be some downtown real estate and a false store-front Web site. This is the white dwarf stage. And there are hundreds more flickering, spewing gas and spitting out  used up matter.

Journalists think of corporate PR types as ‘sinners.’ It’s wrong to work in free enterprise?

Newspaper journaists look down their noses at PR professionals who want to come back to the fold. Did you know they were so elitist? What kind of information are J-school students being fed?

By Mick Gregory

More rosey advice from the newspaper “recruiter” Joe Grimm.

Getting Back to Journalism from PR?
Q. Since graduating from college in 2006, I have been working as a public relations coordinator and have been very successful at the small agency I am at. However, I find myself wanting to jump back into journalism, which I majored in, in the next couple years.

Mick Gregory’s advice — Are you OK? Taking all your meds? So you graduated way back in 2006. That was only a year ago. You have to stick it out a little longer than that. I think you had better look into the salary level of journalists at mid-sized newspapers. For recent college grads you are looking at $35,000 a year — at the top of scale. On the other hand, who’s hiring?

I know there are a lot of journalists in the region who are moving from the field into PR, but I was wondering how successful public relations professionals going into broadcast or print have been. With so many newspapers or television stations asking for clippings or a tape of previous broadcast work, I find myself feeling discouraged and settling into a pigeonhole that I may not want to be inside in the next few years.

What do you think? What steps should I be taking to make the career leap down the line?

Clipped Wings
Here’s Grimm’s advice: (Note, no mention of money)
A. This will not be easy.

You need to have recent clips to compete with others. You will run into a lot of questions about why you went into public relations and whether you will follow journalistic principles.

The only thing you can do about those questions is develop some good answers that essentially show you’ve turned your back on public relations. Editors like recovering sinners — not that you are, but they might treat you like one.

Those who create the news, create the present, past and future

Mick Gregory

Those who control the past control the future. Those who control the present control the past.– George Orwell


The past, present and future have been created and controlled by the liberal media for the past 55 years. Now we are finding out that it was LBJ who was the main benificiary and master mind behind JFK’s assassination. It was Democrat LBJ who escaleated the Vietnam War within days of becoming president. Yet, today, becuase of the whitewash by the liberal media, Richard Nixon is remembered as the evil, plotting president. In fact, Nixon got us out of the war. Nixon created the Environmental Protection Agency, Nixon put a halt to the U.S. use of biological weapons. Who initiated the use of bio weapons? FDR. Who put American citizens in prison camps? FDR.

Remember the Valerie Plame drama? It should have been called the Mrs. Wilson covered for hubby case.

Briefly, she sent her husband Wilson on a government paid trip to Africa to ask a few questions about Iraq agents trying to purchase yellow cake uranium, though they both were both Clinton Democrats and anti-Bush and trying to discredit the CIA Iraq nuclear weapons investigation.

The press made it look like Cheney was trying to discredit and expose a CIA agent. That is very creative news reporting.

Now we know this:
Columnist Robert Novak said Saturday Joe Wilson did not forcefully object to the naming of his CIA operative wife, Valerie Plame Wilson, when Novak spoke to him prior to the publication of a column that sparked a federal investigation and sent White House aide I. Lewis “Scooter” Libby to jail.
“He was not terribly exercised about it,” Novak said.

Instead, Wilson focused on not being portrayed as simply an opponent of the Iraq war. Wilson also stressed that his wife went by his last name, Wilson, rather than Plame, Novak said.
Novak forcefully defended his handling of the column and the legal wrangling that surrounded the special counsel investigation in a seminar on the CIA leak case at the 2007 Society of Professional Journalists Convention.

“It was an off-hand remark to a question I asked in an interview I requested,” Novak said. “This was not a conspiracy in the federal government to go after Valerie Plame Wilson.”

Novak said he complied with prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald’s subpoena to testify because his lawyer told him he had no legal grounds to resist, and losing a court fight could erode the legal protections of the press. He noted that, as a syndicated columnist, he had to pay the legal fees himself, to the tune of $160,000. His home newspaper, the Chicago Sun-Times, contributed $30,000, he said.

He was surprised when the questioning began, that he was not pressed on his source. The reason, he said, was that Fitzgerald already knew that it was then Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage.

At one point, he recalled, former White House aide Kenneth Duberstein called Novak on Armitage’s behalf, asking if Armitage was the source.

“I said, ‘I can’t give you that information,’” Novak said with a grin.

Novak said his critics, including those in the press, have attacks his ethics, when in fact their quarrel was with his ideology.

“I was stunned by how little editorial support I received. I was under assault from editorial writers from across the country,” Novak said. “It is startling how little is known about this case by the people who are commenting on it.”

He said his case shows the need for a shield law like the one approved last week by a Senate committee. But he added, “Is it not hypocritical for my critics to support a law that would have saved me from three years of confrontation?”

The liberal media no longer controls the past with citizen journalists.

Death of a Newspaper Man — Just as low end and depressing as ‘Death of a Salesman’

By Mick Gregory

Excuse my dark fascination with Joe Grimm’s newspaper HR advice column at Poynter Online. I may have Munchhausen Syndrome by Proxy or something.

Many jounalists must have some kind of delusions of status and grandure. Are J-schools preparing them for the marketplace (the real world)? If not, there are thousands of graduates who should file lawsuits for false marketing of communications and journalisim degrees at any of the Top 50 universities. Shouldn’t these institutions have to report numbers of graduates who land jobs in journalisim? And what they average in income like engineers, MBAs, and other fields?

It’s time we told the truth to these sad bastards heading for a life of cuts, low pay and false promises.

Here is another sad case:
My entire career has been at papers larger than 60,000. Almost two years ago I left to take a job as a managing editor at a very small newspaper to get into management. At the time, a friend warned me the paper might force me into working so many hours that I wouldn’t have time for anything else.

After studying the resources available to the paper, I figured things would be OK. Well, since I got here, we have lost 1.5 positions in the newsroom. I’m always trying to get things done and I’m working 10 to 14 hours a day (more often on the upper end). I’m working on my master’s thesis right now and we’re expecting a baby soon (both will be done in about six months). I’ve been to the doctor because of chest pains (not heart attacks). I have also become very short-tempered of late. I feel like my anger is almost out of control.

I want to help our company do more with the Internet but I can’t even get my hands on the Web site. We had a story yesterday that we ended up getting scooped on because we had to wait to print.

Wow, a 10,000 paper gets scooped. Who knew?

When I talk to my publisher about my frustrations with the quality of journalism we’re doing he suggests that my expectations are too high for our situation.

Listen to the publisher. He/she has a grip on reality.

I was planning on leaving in six months, but I’m now asking is that wise? Should I leave before my temper becomes worse? Should I quit and finish my thesis and then find a new job? Or should I endure, hoping I can make a positive difference in a place that I’m worrying will ever change?

Where are you going to go?

Frustrated in Podunk

I am worried for you and your growing family. I am glad you are seeing a doctor.

Chest pains and anger verging on the uncontrollable are not to be taken lightly. Stress will not diminish after the baby comes.

Joe Grimm
Enduring this is not a formula for success. Nor is flat-out quitting.

You’ve got to reduce your hours immediately and stop trying to save the whole newspaper all by yourself. It can’t happen. Talk to your editors, cut back to a more manageable schedule and let some responsibilities go to other people or cut them out of the agenda. This will be difficult at first, but the chance to spend more time at home and do some better decision-making should show some immediate benefits.

Keep looking for that new job, but be cautious about the few months on either side of the due date. You don’t want to compound work stress with the joyful stress of having a baby and the aggravation of moving.

Follow doctor’s orders, of course, and visit the newspaper’s Human Resources department to see whether there is an Employee Assistance Program that can also help with some of the health issues you describe.

Coming Friday: The newspaper where he interned went up for sale with the understanding that it will be closed if a buyer isn’t found. He wonders whether there is a bigger story in this.

Grimm Fairy Tales for Journalism Students

By Mick Gregory

I am fascinated by the deluded, foggy, liberal idealists who wasted their parents’ hard earned savings on “J-school” degrees. Here is another reporter/journalist candidate who wrote in to “Brother (Joe) Grimm” (His real name) at the Poynter Institute.

I don’t have to comment on this entry. Read for yourself what this sad young bastard is doing. Working for free at such low level papers as a 9,000 weekly; a fry cook at IHOP has more prestige and a lot better pay.

How Can Internship No. 4 Help Me?
I know that everybody does it, but I can’t resist thanking you for running your column.

I’m a rising senior in political science doing my third internship, and the odds look good for a fourth one in the fall. Three or four internships sound good, but I have doubts about how editors will feel about these internships when it comes time to apply for a job.

Internship number one was at a 9,000-circulation daily in Pennsylvania, 40 hours per week, unpaid. I wrote an average of three or four stories a week, and did grunt-work otherwise. It was a great introduction to professional journalism, and I got a top-notch evaluation.

Number two was at a 27,000 or so circulation daily in Massachusetts, 10 hours per week (during a school semester), unpaid. I wrote one or two stories a week, and once again, great evaluation.

Number three is at a daily of about 18,000 circulation in New York, 18 hours per week, unpaid. I’m writing about four or five stories each week, and I feel like I’m really being challenged and being kept busy. I feel like the editors like my work and that I’ll get a good evaluation.

And if number four happens, it’ll be at a 100,000 circulation daily in New York, 8 hours a week, unpaid.

I also recently founded, and am the editor-in-chief of, my college’s online-only newspaper.

So, my fear is that these newspapers are too small for an editor to appreciate. I certainly appreciate them, and in fact, I feel like I had a lot more hands-on experience at them than I would have had at much larger newspapers. But I’m not the one whose opinion ultimately matters on that.

Is my fear well-grounded? And, if so, how can I increase my chances of getting a good job?

Thanks,

Timothy

The number of internships is fine, as they are all coming before you graduate. Three or four post-grad internships — now that could be a problem.

The pattern you have raises three issues, but all can be cured if your next internship is a good one. The first issue is that most of your internships have been for fewer than 20 hours a week, and the trend has been toward shorter and shorter ones.

Joe Grimm
The next problem is related: The size of the companies you work for goes up and down.

And the third problem is that no one has paid you yet. Certainly, you feel that pain. And it is a testament to your tenacity that you work for free. But we need to get someone at a solid daily — it need not be huge — to hire you for a full-time, paid internship. Ten hours a week just isn’t nearly as intense or impressive as full-time.

And while you have worked hard at your internships, the idea that interns at large newspapers are somehow sitting around waiting to deliver coffee and sandwiches — or merely observing — is pretty much urban folklore. They’re working, and their clips prove it.

Take the initiative you have shown in founding an online publication, and use those qualities to try to get a good internship where your online awareness could benefit the newspaper. It might ensure that your fourth internship is the launching pad you need. — Mr. Grimm.

How about internship No. 5 or 6?

Isn’t it a lie to call unpaid “gofor” positions interns? What kind of corporate shill are you?
Mr. Grimm, have you no shame?

Is another major political figure a closeted gay, but this time protected by the liberal media? Is Hillary a lesbian, having an affair with Huma Abedin?

Mick Gregory

UPDATE: Now the most prestigiuos newspaper in London asks the question that the U.S. mainstream media can’t ask. Is Hillary a lesbian?

The TIMES of London published a full page photo takeout on Hillary Clinton and her beautiful personal assistant.
pantsuit1.jpg
“Hillary Clinton has been accused of having an affair with Huma Abedin,” reads the caption.
Now that Republican Senator Larry Craig has been outed as a closeted gay, when is the next shoe or pair of panties going to drop?

What if Hillary Clinton is a closeted lesbian? Shouldn’t she be under the same media attacks as Larry Craig?
In a free society with unbiased media, yes.

You know that there must be beads of sweat forming on the forheads of Hillary’s campaign staff.
This may be known as the September gay/lesbian surprise.

The San Francisco Chronicle and LA Times have had tips sent in from lesbian lovers and other gay/lesbian/transgender “fun times” regarding the New York Senator. Google these word combinations: Hillary, lesbian studies, Hillary bisexual, Carole Migden, lesbian, San Francisco, gay pride, Hillary lesbian, Janet Reno

I guess those are written off as coming from conservative Christians.

But the landscape has changed. It seems to matter to the media if a politician is gay and hiding it.

The timing is right for the L-word bombshell to drop. Ironically, the bimbo squad will have to be put on alert, this time to shut up bimbo lesbians with bribes and threats.

Even a life-long liberal jounalist knows that this could be his/her big break. It will be tempting. Though the reporter who does drop the L-bomb will be kicked out of the Democrat Party for life, and have a visit from the Clinton contractors.

Former NY Times writer Edward Klein, author of the new book “The Truth About Hillary: What She Knew, When She Knew It, and How Far She’ll Go to Become President” says it’s true.

According to an article on PageOne Q’s website, Klein’s new book has ‘explosive’ claims about the former First Lady, current Senator, and potential future candidate for President.

Klein claims such things as:

the culture of lesbianism has influenced Hillary’s political goals and personal life since she was a student at Wellesley, an elite college near Boston she ’embraced’ revolutionary lesbianism when she was young and tolerated her husband’s philandering because their marriage was a largely sexless political convenience.

Many of Hillary’s closest friends and aides were lesbians.

Now, after many years of public apprehension the controversy has been confirmed by insider sources and will soon be revealed to the public, but not by the San Francisco Chronicle or New York Times.

If the Clinton machine works its magic, they will keep the mainstream media in line and in fear.

It’s not as if there were no evidence.

Remember Bill Clinton’s former lover, Gennifer Flowers? She wrote in her book “Passion & Betrayal” of Bill confessing to her that Hillary sleeps with more woman than he does.

The mainstream media gave her no traction, but the book sold well.

Now, it’s a different climate. And outing is in again.
So this is a partial list:

A beauty in her early 30s who often travels with Hillary.
A popular TV and movie star.
The daughter of a top government official.
A stunning model who got a career boost after sleeping with Hillary.

If only a few of these rumors pan out, that’s a lot more gay sex involving Hillary Clinton than Larry Craig.

The commentator Jack Wheeler wrote: “My sources indicate that Hillary is bisexual and fools around more than her husband.” He also credits Hillary for being the force behind the “White House’s homosexual agenda.”

According to the insiders report, Hillary had sex with women during her college days at Wellesly College.

The pant suits she wears.

Chelsea Clinton was conceived as a political ploy to cover up Hillary’s sexuality. That has a ring of truth, doesn’t it?

Sex toys were put on the White House Christmas tree, i.e. dildos and vibrators. What gay festivities!

I think a very big pair of panties are about to drop.

Maybe if Hillary Obama win in ’08, the Fairness Doctrine will shut down Google.

Washington Post Radio Washed Up — It’s Not Fair!

Mick Gregory

Washington Post Radio, which promoted the newspaper’s journalists on local D.C. air waves, will go off the air next month after failing to attract enough listeners and losing money during its 17-month existence.

It seems that the dull, liberal pabulum didn’t even play well in one of the nation’s most left-leaning markets. It is not a mistake to see the Washing Post Company pull the plug soon after Roberto Gonzalez resigned. The Left’s latest punching bag had quit. No more traction. Also, why preach to the choir? All the lefties in D.C. are going to vote for Hillary/Obama. The station wouldn’t get advertising from the DNC. Of course, not even Ron Paul would advertise on that station from the right.

Post Radio, which is broadcast regionwide on two sations, 107.7 FM and 1500 AM, was not able to draw even 1 percent of listeners during its first year.

Infomercials for vitamins get much larger audiences!

The two companies will announce Friday that WTWP (WTheWashingtonPost) — will go off the air by the end of September. The stations will continue to carry news and talk programming without an association with The Post.

Billed as a new kind of radio programming when it began in March of last year, Post Radio, or WTWP AM-FM, featured in-depth discussions with Post reporters and editors about the day’s news. The station’s backers said it would be like “NPR on caffeine” for liberal slanted newsy listeners. It was actually NPR on Exlax and Sominex.

Some local programs, such as David Burd’s morning show, will continue on the new, still-unnamed replacement station, but the bulk of the broadcasting day will be filled with syndicated talk shows.

Ironically, conservative-libertarian talk show host Glenn Beck has been rumored to be one of the replacement shows on what will be an entirely new station with new call letters.

This was another lesson in free enterprise. The left’s Air (head) America and NPR on green tea, can’t compete in the free market of ideas. They don’t understand America. That’s why the Democrats will bring back the Fairness Doctrine as soon as they get control of the White House.

Bonneville paid an annual fee to The Post for access to its journalists and for the use of The Post’s name. The Post, which had no direct financial investment in the stations, will make a small profit from the fee payments, an executive familiar with the agreement said yesterday.

In addition to WTWP, the Salt Lake City-based Bonneville owns all-news WTOP (820 AM and 103.5 FM) in Washington and WFED (1050 AM), which broadcasts news about the federal government.

“It has been a good experiment during which we learned about radio as one of the platforms on which we can put Washington Post journalists and journalism,” said Leonard Downie, The Post’s executive editor. Downie declined to comment directly on WTWP’s demise.

During the recent spring ratings period, WTWP finished tied for 18th place among local stations, with an average of 1.2 percent of the audience, according to Arbitron. It was the station’s best three-month performance since its inception. What a stink bomb.

Meanwhile, the print side of the mainstream media continues to shed its losers.

Newspaper publisher E.W. Scripps Co. said Tuesday it is seeking a buyer for The Albuquerque Tribune, an afternoon newspaper that publishes Monday through Saturday.

E.W. Scripps will shut down the newspaper if it cannot find a “qualified” buyer, but did not indicate how long it will search for a new investor or what price it was seeking for the newspaper.

The Albuquerque Tribune currently has a joint operating agreement with the Albuquerque Journal, the daily morning newspaper in the city. That deal, which is scheduled to run through 2022, is expected to be terminated. The agreement requires the Journal’s parent company, Journal Publishing Co., to run the business operations of the Journal in exchange for a share of profits from the newspaper. My guess is that Scripps would get more revenue by shutting off the life support of the Albuquerque Tribune and laugh all the way to the bank through 2022.

Prediction: They won’t find a qualified buyer.

What’s the difference between a journalist and a reporter?

Mick Gregory

Only snobs or egomaniacs call themselves journalists. I have to admit, I like the term citizen journalist, because it has a ring of truth to it and it annoys mainstream journos.

A cub reporter in the 1950s asked his boss what the difference was between a reporter and a journalist.
He said, “a journalist had two suits, a reporter only one.”

Today, reporters don’t even bother to wear ties, let alone cheap suits. But the “executive editors” still need that differentiation or class definition of wearing a dark suit to the office. They are lords of the newsroom over scores of slobs.

Now you know why I call my blog sadbastards. I’m giving you a peek behind the curtains, before the final act of the once great print empire and the sad, egomaniacal editors scrambling to keep their status relevant.

The Media Mob Snobs.

The battle for dominance between the mainstream media and citizen journalists is boiling. Some have their panties in a bunch.

By Mick Gregory

James Lewis at American Thinker, penned this gem about “The Media Mob”:

Like other unaccountable elites, they are monumentally fickle, self-indulgent, snobbish, vain, vulgar, entitled, incestuous, arrogant, ignorant, unprincipled, hysterical, and demagogic. They sound like a unified chorus for the same reasons that street mobs run as a group — because by and large, they don’t dare to stand alone.

Pinchy — Time to fly back to the Aspen Institute to discuss how much more objective the press is than blogs. Could you pass me that organic Grey Pupon?

James Lewis nailed it. Congratulations!