Anniversary of JFK assassination Nov. 22, 1963

It’s the 45th anniversary of the JFK assassination in Dallas, Texas. The names connected have come to light after nearly half a century: LBJ, Clay Shaw, Lee Harvey Oswald, Jack Ruby, Fidel Castro, Schlumberger Tool Co, General Dynamics, Woody Harrleson Sr.,  The Texas Book Depository, Elm Street, Warren Commission, mafia, pro-democracy Cubans and the USSR. 

There are still thousands of pages of testimony and evidence locked up until 2038. Often, the truth leaks out anyway.

 

This is what we know:

Oswald was well trained in Russian, a U.S. Marine who was allowed to leave the military early becuase of a family hardship. WIthin weeks he defected to the USSR. He was brought back to the U.S. with a Russian bride. This shows he was “liked” by the U.S. Special Forces.

After 10 hours of questioning at DPD headquarters, there were no recordings or notes.

What was Oswald saying that was so controversial that notes were not kept?

Then, Oswald repeats “I’m a patsy. I didn’t shoot the president.” 

Next, he is silenced by Jack Ruby. That was a mob hit and Ruby was a Chicago small time mobster with a strip club in Dallas. This link has the most up-to-date information: http://www.jfkmurdersolved.com/ruby.htm

The magic bullet that caused seven wounds on Governor Conelly and JFK and was found in perfect shape in the limo, but to be precise, on the president’s stretcher. The other bullets were hallow point to cause maximum damage. Do  you want to see the bullet? You can. Google it  on the Time-Life images.

Close to 50 eye witnesses to the shooting said there were four to five shots. One witness was hit with a bullet fragment in the face. Several people pointed to a gun shot, smoke and a flash of light behind a picket fence next to the railroad bridge. 

“That SOB with the Irish mafia will never embarrass me again,” said LBJ on Nov. 21. This according to H.L. Hunt and LBJ’s mistress. 

The Warren Commission cover up backed by the major media was the turning point of America’s trust in government and media. The Commission findings were published in 22 volumns. All the fluff.

Who had the most to benefit?

A decade after LBJ’s death, a friend of Estes, a federal marshal, talked Estes into coming forward with what he knew about Henry Marshall’s death. Then on August 9, 1984, following Billie Sol Estes’ grand jury testimonyregarding Mac Wallace’s murder of Henry Marshall, Estes’ attorney, Douglas Caddy sent a letter to Stephen S. Trott, Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division, of the US Department of Justice. The letter
reads:

Lyndon’s scandalous wheeling and dealing from his Senate days were catching up with him even faster than the Billie Sol Estes affair, and it would bring the whole Democratic party down with it if the key players weren’t thrown overboard. Estes and to a lesser degree Johnson were the primary benefactors of their doings, while everyone on Capitol Hill knew Bobby Baker, and every lawyer, lobbyist, and lawmaker wanted a piece of the action — and Bobby was LBJ’s boy. The dealings had been too many to keep quiet with a quick “Texas suicide.” LBJ wasn’t just looking at the end of his political career; he was looking at hard time.

Dear Mr. Trott:

My client, Mr. Estes, has authorized me to make this reply to your letter
of May 29, 1984.

Mr. Estes was a member of a four-member group, headed by Lyndon Johnson,
which committed criminal acts in Texas in the 1960s. The other two,
besides Mr. Estes and LBJ, were [White House aide] Cliff Carter and Mac
Wallace. Mr. Estes is willing to disclose his knowledge concerning the
following criminal offenses:

1. Murders

1. The killing of Henry Marshall 2. The killing of George Krutilek 3. The
killing of Ike Rogers and his secretary 4. The killing of Harold Orr 5.
The killing of Coleman Wade 6. The killing of Josefa Johnson 7. The
killing of John Kinser 8. The killing of President J. F. Kennedy

Mr. Estes is willing to testify that LBJ ordered these killings, and that
he transmitted his orders through Cliff Carter to Mac Wallace, who
executed the murders. In the cases of murders nos. 1-7, Mr. Estes’
knowledge of the precise details concerning the way the murders were
executed stems from conversations he had shortly after each event with
Cliff Carter and Mac Wallace.

In addition, a short time after Mr. Estes was released from prison in 1971, he met with Cliff Carter and they reminisced about what had occurred in the past, including the murders. During their conversation, Carter spoke of a list of 17 murders which had been committed, some of which Mr. Estes was unfamiliar with. A living witness was present at that meeting and should be willing to testify about it. He is Kyle Brown, recently of Houston and now living in Brady, Texas. . .

More to come…