Major tunnel 30 miles north of downtown Los Angels destroyed by explosion–flames pour out of both ends.

Another dramatic explosion on a major U.S. interstate highway.
Terrorisim? Don’t even ask.

By Mick Gregory

Interstate 5 is a key route connecting Southern and Northern California, as well as a major commuter link between Los Angeles and its northern suburbs. The affected stretch of freeway carries about 225,000 vehicles a day, and there are likely to be huge traffic jams in the area if it is still closed when people return to work Monday.

Several burned alive in explosion. Firefighters could find more bodies as they explored the charred tunnel. They hope to finish the search by Sunday morning, said Deputy Fire Chief John Tripp.

That was last week. Today, hundreds of thousands have been evacuated by firestorms.

The pileup in the southbound truck tunnel of Interstate 5 began about 11 p.m. Friday when two big rigs collided on the rain-slickened highway about 30 miles north of downtown Los Angeles. As crashes continued throughout the 550-foot-long tunnel, five tractor-trailers burst into flames, and the fire quickly spread.

The cause of the crash is being investigated.
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A military rocket launcher found in the front yard of Niranjana Besai in Jersey City

Mick Gregory

These used rocket launchers are actually worthless. I’ve seen them at Army surplus stores.

Yet, Drudge reports that a Jersey City woman made a “shocking discovery” on her lawn this morning when she noticed a military rocket launcher lying in the grass.

Niranjana Besai was leaving her house, located at 88 Nelson Street, to go to work just after 8 this morning when she spotted the launcher on her front lawn. “I read it and it [said] ‘missile,'” Besai told news reporters. “There was little ‘missile’ [writing] on it.”

She immediately called police.

Sources report that the device is an AT-4 missile launcher that is used to fire against tanks and buildings. The device was first approved by the U.S. Army in 1985 and questions are being raised as to whether the device was stolen from a branch of the military.

Its very powerful warheads can penetrate through well over a foot of armor, however each launcher can only be used once. The device found on Besai’s lawn was said to have been used previously and deemed inoperable.

Investigators are now trying to determine when and even where the launcher had been fired.

Officials initially expressed concern after discovering that Besai’s house is located along a flight path for Newark Liberty International Airport.

Residents along Nelson Street were alarmed by the discovery.

Besai’s neighbor, Joe Quinn, said he was outside of his home when he noticed Besai pointing at the device from her front porch. When he walked over to see what the fuss was about, he was just as shocked to see weapon, said to be about three or four feet long and weighing about 15 pounds.

“She’s pointing that there’s something in the front,” he told CBS 2 HD. “I said, ‘Let me come down and take a look,’ and I saw a little soldier on it and I said, ‘Whoa, that’s a missile launcher or something!'”

Quinn says he originally thought the launcher was just a pipe, but after noticing the picture of the soldier — which he described as a soldier kneeling, holding the launcher — he realized it looked similar to a missile launcher he’d seen on television. “I got scared myself,” he says. “It looked like a bazooka, and right away you think what does somebody want with something like that?”

Jersey City Police removed the launcher, and the incident is now being investigated by the Joint Terrorism Task Force and the FBI.

Sources say Besai is not involved in the investigation as a suspect. “I don’t think it was hers, they’re nice people,” Quinn said.

Tanker Explosions on Major Highways in Houston and San Francisco Within Days of Each other

Mick Gregory

The nation’s fourth largest city, Houston, and fifth largest metro area, San Francisco/Oakland, had fiery tanker explosions at the areas’ major highway intersections within days of each other this weekend. Both “accidents” occured at intersections that average 280,000 and 200,000 cars a day.

There won’t be a connection made in the media or by the government. The Democrat-controlled media doesn’t want the public to realize the extent of the war on terror. It will be up to citizen journalists to expose the facts and connect the dots.

UPDATE: The driver who crashed a tanker loaded with gasoline and brought down a heavily trafficked highway overpass was given a commercial trucker’s license despite a history of criminal convictions, including drug and burglary arrests.
Mr. Mosqueda, 51, also got a special hazardous materials endorsement last year from the federal Transportation Security Administration despite regulations that can disqualify applicants with multiple convictions. To get it, he had to undergo an FBI criminal history check and an intelligence background check.

If gas tankers are not potential targets? Why the FBI background checks?
OK, what did the background check reveal? First of all, isn’t the name Mosqueda a little weird?

Here is a report on the Houston fire bomb.

Police said Luis Perez took a ramp at the interchange too quickly and lost control just after midnight Friday.

“It appears the vehicle may have been traveling fast enough to cause it to roll over,” Capt. M.W. Martin said. “When it burst into flames its cargo also ignited, causing an explosion.”
Massive flames extended about three stories high.
Perez, 39, was killed instantly, police said.

“There is fire and heat damage to the overpass,” Martin said.
The intense heat caused parts of the concrete overpasses to crumble and turn into gravel.

What a coincidence. Could there have been remote-controlled bombs placed on the highways? Is Al-Qaeda behind these “accidents?” Why isn’t the mainstream media reporting the possible connection? How would you like to be a BART commuter this morning?

Less than 48 hours later this tanker exploded in Oakland.

A tanker truck crashed and burst into flames near the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge on Sunday, creating such intense heat that a stretch of highway melted and collapsed. Officials predicted a traffic nightmare for Bay Area commuters for weeks or months to come.

Flames shot 200 feet in the air, but the truck’s driver walked away from the scene with second-degree burns. No other injuries were reported in the 3:45 a.m. crash, which officials said could have been deadly had it occurred at a busier time.

“I’ve never seen anything like it,” Officer Trent Cross of the California Highway Patrol said of the crumpled interchange. “I’m looking at this thinking, ‘Wow, no one died’ – that’s amazing. It’s just very fortunate.”

Authorities said the damage could take months to repair, and that it would cause the worst disruption for Bay Area commuters since the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake damaged a section of the Bay Bridge itself.

UPDATE: Evidence disposed of in China
Thursday, May 10th, 2007
If the collapse was just a freak accident, why won’t the government let forensic engineers examine the site? Caltrans is preventing leading civil engineers from examining the wreckage. Instead, the debris is being shipped to China for “recycling” without being examined, even though steel is worth a mere 15 cents/pound, hardly enough to cover the shipping costs.

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What the Government Knew
Wednesday, May 9th, 2007
Records have surfaced showing the exploding tanker truck carried extra gasoline — more than is legal — on past delivery missions on four separate occassions. This new information adds a new wrinkle to our understanding of 4/29. It’s very possible that when it crashed, the tanker truck had been illegally overloaded with yet-another cargo of dangerous, freeway-destroying gasoline.

But why? Who would want the highways to be travelled by a flammable truck stuffed with extra gasoline — and driven in a truck with a history of brake problems?

Look at the facts. Government agents had already spotted the truck and the extra gasoline it carried. But the California Highway Patrol had also once identified the exploding tanker truck’s brakes as so dangerously faulty, they’d immediately ordered it not to return to the highway.

But then new brakes were mysteriously delivered and installed at the inspection site — and the doomed tanker continued on towards its catastrophic destiny.

The driver, a repeat felon, would be an easier target for pressuring from a rogue official or agencies intent on coercing cooperation. But even if they’d found their man, who would pull the strings to waive the obvious safety regulations to put this plan into action?

These are questions that won’t be asked by people blinded by the “official” story — but there’s a pattern here, and it can’t be wished away. The highway re-opens, the sun shines, and Californians blindly continue on with their lives, imagining a public safety which may no longer exist.

Because the accident occurred where three highways converge, authorities said it could cause commuting problems for hundreds of thousands of people.

Transportation officials said 280,000 commuters take the bridge into San Francisco each day.
On Sunday the collapse doubled the half-hour trip drivers normally face getting to and from San Francisco and the eastern suburbs – even though many didn’t even attempt the trip because of the crash. Traffic appeared light on the bridge itself, but motorists looking to get on and off were backed up on both sides.

Transportation officials said they already had added trains to the Bay Area Rapid Transit rail system that takes commuters across San Francisco Bay, and were urging people to telecommute if possible. In preparation for rush hour, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger authorized funding so that ferries, buses and the rail system could carry commuters free of charge during Monday’s commute.

The tanker carrying 8,600 gallons of gasoline ignited after crashing into a pylon on the interchange.
The driver, J. Mosqueda, 51, was headed from a refinery in Benicia to a gas station near the Oakland Airport when the accident occurred, according to the California Highway Patrol.

A preliminary investigation indicated he may have been speeding on the curving road, Cross said. Mosqueda (unusual name) was being treated in a hospital for burns Sunday; the hospital would not transfer media calls to his room.

Witnesses reported flames rising up to 200 feet into the air. Heat exceeded 2,750 degrees and caused the steel beams holding up the interchange from eastbound I-80 to eastbound Interstate 580 above to buckle and bolts holding the structure together to melt, leading to the collapse, California Department of Transportation director Will Kempton said.
The charred section of collapsed freeway was draped at a sharp angle onto the highway beneath, exposing a web of twisted metal beneath the concrete. Officials said that altogether a 250-yard portion of the upper roadway was damaged.

Fatal fiery blast closes I-10, U.S. 59 ramps in Houston, kills tanker driver.
Fiery explosion kills tanker driver, will lead to repairs of marred freeway

The fiery and fatal explosion of a tanker truck just north of downtown is expected to shut down one ramp of a heavily used interchange for at least a week and create a bottleneck on another for possibly two months.

The driver, tentatively identified as Luis Perez, 39, of Houston, died in flames that reduced the truck to rubble. Dental records will confirm his identity, investigators said, and they added that the family has been notified.

Police did not identify the owner of the truck, the cargo it was carrying, or its origin and destination.

A Houston ordinance generally bars vehicles carrying hazardous materials from entering areas inside Loop 610 unless they are delivering or picking up cargo.

Both diesel fuel, which some reports said the truck was carrying, and gasoline, which is more likely to cause a series of explosions like those some people heard, are considered hazardous materials under the ordinance, said Police Lt. Gary Scheibe.

The accident occurred about midnight Frida on a ground-level ramp that takes traffic from southbound U.S. 59, the Eastex Freeway, to eastbound I-10, the East Freeway.

Police said the load “apparently shifted” as the tanker went east, causing the truck to roll and hit the barrier wall, spilling fuel on the freeway.

Texas Department of Transportation spokesman Norm Wigington said the heat caused severe damage to the concrete pavement, which will have to be fixed. The ramp will probably be closed one or two weeks.

During that time, southbound traffic on U.S. 59 can detour to exit onto I-10 west and U-turn at San Jacinto to double back eastward.

The towering flames and intense heat also blackened and damaged a ramp that passes over the accident site and takes traffic from eastbound I-10 to northbound U.S. 59.

Inspection showed four steel box beams on that ramp were damaged enough to need replacing, Wigington said.

“It will take about two months to have them rebuilt off-site, and then we’ll probably shut down the ramp for a weekend and install them,” he said.

During the wait, he said, one lane of the two-lane ramp will remain closed. The other, which was reopened about noon Friday, is expected to remain in use, although the narrowing could cause rush-hour backups.

Although TxDOT does not normally make traffic counts for ramps, the agency estimates that the main lanes of U.S. 59 at the busy interchange carry more than 200,000 vehicles a day, and those of I-10 at the interchange carry about 160,000.

Authorities said the crash sparked a four-part explosion that shook the surrounding area. Heat from the flames was so intense, they said, that it caused parts of the concrete to turn back into gravel.

Firefighters were able to extinguish the blaze in about two hours, authorities said. The accident is under investigation.
The cost of the repairs would likely run into the tens of millions of dollars, and the state was seeking federal disaster aid, Kempton said. Schwarzenegger late Sunday issued an emergency declaration to allow repairs to happen faster, said Adam Mendelsohn, the governor’s spokesman.
The Bay Bridge consists of two heavily traveled, double-decked bridges about two miles long straddling San Francisco Bay.

San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom said the accident showed how fragile the Bay area’s transportation network is, whether to an earthquake or terrorist attack, and has the potential to have a major economic effect on the city.
“It’s another giant wakeup call,” Newsom told reporters at the California Democratic Party convention in San Diego.

Yes, Mr. Newsom, it woke some of us up to the knowledge that we may be under attack.