Obama, Chavez and Hillary upset with Hondurans because they won’t let their leftist president remain in office for life like Castro and Chavez

By Mick Gregory

Did CNN or MSNBC report the details? 

Hugo Chávez’s socialist-building efforts suffered a minor setback yesterday when the Honduran military were ordered by the Honduras Supreme Court to expell its leftist president  Mel Zelaya for abusing the nation’s constitution.

Zeaya, with the help of Chavez wanted to hold an illegal special election last Sunday that would change the Honduran Constitution and allow him to remain “El Presidente” for life. That is a model set by Fidel Castro and followed by Hugo Chavez. 

 This report is from the Wall Street Journal:

El President l Zelaya miscalculated when he tried to emulate the success of his good friend Hugo Chavez in reshaping the Honduran Constitution to his liking.

But Honduras is not out of the Venezuelan woods yet. Yesterday the Central American country was being pressured to restore the authoritarian Mr. Zelaya by the likes of Fidel Castro, Daniel Ortega, Hillary Clinton and, of course, Hugo himself. The Organization of American States, having ignored Mr. Zelaya’s abuses, also wants him back in power. It will be a miracle if Honduran patriots can hold their ground.

That Mr. Zelaya acted as if he were above the law. While Honduran law allows for a constitutional rewrite, the power to open that door does not lie with the president. A constituent assembly can only be called through a national referendum approved by its Congress.

But Mr. Zelaya declared the vote on his own and had Mr. Chávez ship him the necessary ballots from Venezuela. The Supreme Court ruled his referendum unconstitutional, and it instructed the military not to carry out the logistics of the vote as it normally would do.

The top military commander, Gen. Romeo Vásquez Velásquez, told the president that he would have to comply. Mr. Zelaya promptly fired him. The Supreme Court ordered him reinstated. Mr. Zelaya refused.

Calculating that some critical mass of Hondurans would take his side, the president decided he would run the referendum himself. So on Thursday he led a mob that broke into the military installation where the ballots from Venezuela were being stored and then had his supporters distribute them in defiance of the Supreme Court’s order.

The attorney general had already made clear that the referendum was illegal, and he further announced that he would prosecute anyone involved in carrying it out. Yesterday, Mr. Zelaya was arrested by the military and is now in exile in Costa Rica.

It remains to be seen what Mr. Zelaya’s next move will be. It’s not surprising that chavistas throughout the region are claiming that he was victim of a military coup. They want to hide the fact that the military was acting on a court order to defend the rule of law and the constitution, and that the Congress asserted itself for that purpose, too.

Mrs. Clinton has piled on as well. Yesterday she accused Honduras of violating “the precepts of the Interamerican Democratic Charter” and said it “should be condemned by all.” Fidel Castro did just that. Mr. Chávez pledged to overthrow the new government.

Honduras is fighting back by strictly following the constitution. The Honduran Congress met in emergency session yesterday and designated its president as the interim executive as stipulated in Honduran law. It also said that presidential elections set for November will go forward. The Supreme Court later said that the military acted on its orders. It also said that when Mr. Zelaya realized that he was going to be prosecuted for his illegal behavior, he agreed to an offer to resign in exchange for safe passage out of the country. Mr. Zelaya denies it.

Many Hondurans are going to be celebrating Mr. Zelaya’s foreign excursion. Street protests against his heavy-handed tactics had already begun last week. On Friday a large number of military reservists took their turn. “We won’t go backwards,” one sign said. “We want to live in peace, freedom and development.”

Besides opposition from the Congress, the Supreme Court, the electoral tribunal and the attorney general, the president had also become persona non grata with the Catholic Church and numerous evangelical church leaders. On Thursday evening his own party in Congress sponsored a resolution to investigate whether he is mentally unfit to remain in office.

For Hondurans who still remember military dictatorship, Mr. Zelaya also has another strike against him: He keeps rotten company. Earlier this month he hosted an OAS general assembly and led the effort, along side OAS Secretary General José Miguel Insulza, to bring Cuba back into the supposedly democratic organization.

The OAS response is no surprise. Former Argentine Ambassador to the U.N. Emilio Cárdenas told me on Saturday that he was concerned that “the OAS under Insulza has not taken seriously the so-called ‘democratic charter.’ It seems to believe that only military ‘coups’ can challenge democracy. The truth is that democracy can be challenged from within, as the experiences of Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador, Nicaragua, and now Honduras, prove.” A less-kind interpretation of Mr. Insulza’s judgment is that he doesn’t mind the Chávez-style coup.

The struggle against chavismo has never been about left-right politics. It is about defending the independence of institutions that keep presidents from becoming dictators. This crisis clearly delineates the problem. In failing to come to the aid of checks and balances, Mrs. Clinton and Mr. Insulza expose their true colors.

No companies for old journalists

You would think that corporations would be happy to hire laid off journalists in their Investor Relations, PR, and HSE administrative areas. But there are a few reasons it doesn’t work like that.

First of all, journalists are not attracted to corporations, to put it mildly, the majority despise corporate America. Everything you’ve heard about the “profession” is pretty much accurate. Journalists really are left-wing socialists. (I’m not including those in marketing, PR and communications roles, just the journalists). For journalists, working for a paycheck for a greedy company is the last resort.  They  did not enter the field to become a corporate flack hack (a term they often use).

Here is an example of what kind of work many would love to do to the company they work for. This just happened at the White House:

An embarrassed White House apologized on Tuesday for an “unfortunate mistake” — the distribution of less-than-flattering biography of Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi at the Group of Eight summit. Still, the gaffe led to headlines in Italy.

The summary of Berlusconi was buried in a nearly inch-thick tome of background that the White House distributed at the summit of major economic powers. The press kit was handed out to the White House traveling press corps.

The biography described Berlusconi as one of the “most controversial leaders in the history of a country known for government corruption and vice.”

It was just last month that Berlusconi welcomed Bush to Rome, calling him “a personal friend of mine and also a great friend of Italy.” And Bush responded then: “You’re right. We’re good friends.”

The biography, written by Encyclopedia of World Biography, said Berlusconi burst onto the political scene with no experience and used his “vast network of media holdings” to finance his campaign on a promise to “purge the notoriously lackadaisical Italian government of corruption.”

The biography went on to say that Berlusconi was appointed to the prime minister’s office in 1994, “however, he and his fellow Forza Italia Party leaders soon found themselves accused of the very corruption he had vowed to eradicate.”

In a written apology, White House spokesman Tony Fratto said the biography used insulting language.

“The sentiments expressed in the biography do not represent the views of President Bush, the American government, or the American people,” he said. “We apologize to Italy and to the prime minister for this very unfortunate mistake.”

Corriere della Sera, a leading Italian daily and one of several newspapers featuring the case on its front page, said: “US gaffe, then the apology.”

Do you think that insult was an accident? An unfortunate mistake…

I know several bloggers that would be much more diligent, savvy and loyal to the President of the United States. Any suggestions?

Inside the mind of a journalist — It isn’t rocket surgery

Susan Lindauer, the former Seattle journalist for Hearst’s paper in the cold, foggy city on the Left Coast, arrested by the FBI for acting as an unregistered agent for the Saddam Hussein government, will get a new day in court next week, where she hopes to show she wasn’t an agent, nor crazy. The June 17 mental competency hearing will be held in New York federal court for the onetime P-I reporter. Her own lawyers claimed she was mentally ill.

Lindauer said she was actually working on behalf of the U.S. when she contacted the Iraqis — a defense that federal prosecutors used to have her committed to a federal mental facility in Texas for evaluation. She was later released by U.S. judge Michael Mukasey, now the attorney general. Lindauer has just been re-examined by a government psychiatrist, court records show, and Scoop recently reported that Lindauer’s attorney plans to attack claims she was an Iraqi agent and seek dismissal of the criminal charges.

She wrote to then-Bush chief of staff Andrew Card, who is also her second cousin: “…you must realize that if you go ahead with this invasion, Osama bin Laden will triumph, rising from his grave of seclusion. His network will be swollen with fresh recruits and…the United States will have delivered the death blow to itself.”

No wonder Michael Savage says that liberalisim is a mental disorder.

Isn’t it clear to you now that the editors and reporters running the failing newspapers in California and Seattle, are far left Democrat/Socialists?

The car dealers, home developers and IT professionals had no other choice for newspaper advertising. Now they do, and the media of choice is anything but newspapers.